Easter Eggs-hibits at Buxton Museum

Museums commonly deal with old things and creatures that have long shuffled off the mortal coil. You would not immediately associate them with a holiday like Easter which celebrates new life. However, among the collections at Buxton Museum, there are a few peculiar eggs; traditional symbols at this time of year. We thought we would share some of them with you while we are closed for renovation.

Eggs made from rock, minerals and gemstones were popular in the Victorian and Edwardian eras. We can only speculate why. With no internet, the people of these eras had to resort to talking to each other so perhaps such novelties inspired cheerful conversation. Indeed, Buxton Museum still sells quite a lot of colourful marble eggs in its gift shop. They look pretty and feel pleasingly tactile in the palm of your hand.

blue john egg

This egg has been crafted from the local rare mineral called Blue John, mined in small quantities in the Peak District village of Castleton.  It dates from the early 20th century and is 13cm long. Buxton Museum has all sorts of intriguing objects made from Blue John, all displaying the same unusual purple-blue-yellow colour from which it gets its name; bleu-jaune, meaning blue-yellow in French.

Nest

This is a close-up of a petrified birds’ nest. Objects can be turned into limestone by exposing them to mineral-rich water or “petrifying them”.  This specimen is from the collection of Randolph Douglas who once had his own museum in Castleton, the same village where Blue John can be found. He gathered fascinating items from around the world and exhibited them alongside keys, locks and miniature dioramas of his own ingenious creation. Douglas had a passion for escapology; the art of breaking free from death-defying traps, which ultimately hooked him up with famous magician and escapologist Harry Houdini.

When Buxton Museum and Art Gallery reopens on Tuesday 6 June, you will be able to see brand new displays featuring both Blue John and Randolph Douglas; admission free! We hope to see you.

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3 thoughts on “Easter Eggs-hibits at Buxton Museum

  1. matt smith

    Brilliant read, looking forward to the reopening of the museum. I just hope you still have the grizzly bear.

    Reply

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